AHALIA FOUNDATION EYE HOSPITAL Kerala’s Only JCI accredited Hospital

Uvetis Clinic

 
 

Uveitis Clinic

Uveitis ClinicUveitis is the inflammation of the Uvea which is made up of Iris, Ciliary body and Choroid. If we think of the eye as a hollow, fluid-filled, 3-layered ball, then the outer most layer is the sclera (a tough coat), the inner-most is the retina, (the thin light-gathering layer), and the middle layer is the Uvea (the vascular layer).

Symptoms of Uvetis

  • Eye redness
  • Eye pain
  • Light sensitivity
  • Blurred vision
  • Dark, floating spots in your field of vision (floaters)
  • Decreased vision
Causes


 

Age is a major risk factor for AMD. The disease is most likely to occur after age 60, but it can occur earlier. Other risk factors for AMD include:

 

In about half of all cases, the specific cause of uveitis isn't clear. If a cause can be determined, it may be one of the following:

 

  • Eye injury or surgery
  • An autoimmune disorder, such as sarcoidosis or ankylosing spondylitis
  • An inflammatory disorder, such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis
  • An infection, such as cat-scratch disease, herpes zoster, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, Lyme disease or West Nile virus
  • A cancer that affects the eye, such as lymphoma
Tests

  • Blood tests
  • Analysis of fluid from the eye
  • Photography to evaluate the retinal blood flow (angiography)
  • Photography to measure the thickness of the retinal tissue and to determine the presence or absence of fluid in or under the retina

Treatment 


Medications

 

  • Drugs that reduce inflammation. Your doctor may first prescribe eyedrops with an anti-inflammatory medication, such as a corticosteroid. If those don't help, a corticosteroid pill or injection may be the next step.
  • Drugs that fight bacteria or viruses. If uveitis is caused by an infection, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics, antiviral medications or other medicines, with or without corticosteroids, to bring the infection under control.
  • Drugs that affect the immune system or destroy cells. You may need immunosuppressive or cytotoxic drugs if your uveitis affects both eyes, doesn't respond well to corticosteroids or becomes severe enough to threaten your vision.

 

Surgical and other procedures

 

  • Vitrectomy. Surgery to remove some of the vitreous in your eye (vitrectomy) may be necessary to manage the condition.
  • Surgery that implants a device into the eye to provide a slow and sustained release of a medication. For people with difficult-to-treat posterior uveitis, a device that's implanted in the eye may be an option. This device slowly releases corticosteroid medication into the eye for two to three years. Possible side effects of this treatment include cataracts and glaucoma.

 

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